Wednesday, January 02, 2013

Sports: Penn State's abuse: National Collegiate Athletics Association plunders state tax-payers to underwrite out-of-state athletics and causes

What a cheap and sleazy outfit the National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) is turning out to be.  Their self-advertized attempt to "punish" the tax-payers of Pennsylvania by diverting tax dollars from the state to causes all over the continent sinks to the character-level of the heinous criminal now behind bars.  Like a flock of vultures feeding on carrion, NCAA is trying to cover its own its own mendacious avarice by pretending there is something juridical about gouging Pennsylvanians who must foot the bill for a self-admiring clique of Wink-and-Nodders in the sports hierarchy of Pennsylvania State University, to which for too long the shoud-have-been academic leadership kowtowed for fear of less contributions from alumni — or of student opinion — or of what?  It certainly is a good idea to gather funds to pour back into civic programs, including athletics on all levels in the state where sexual abuse by coaches, teachers and other students in high schools needs to be rooted out.  Also, bullying in general by self-overestimating jocks needs to get a real wallop.  The privileging of jocks in high schools, colleges, and universities is a cultural pattern that needs to be broken in Pennsylvania, but the taxpayers who finance education in the state, the Commonwealth, shoud not have to pay for programs elsewhere.  The NCAA is simply giving us more of the same, plunder the institution, plunder the students, plunder the tax-payers to make themselves look good, give their functionaries personal power by sending funds in one direction instead of another, it's all a pile of sports arrogance in the academic world.  Maybe we need a separation of sports and academy.  Sports corrupted Penn State.  Let free and independent sports associations be responsible for the entirety of their budgets and expenditures, recruitment of players and personnel, and their sexual conduct — not sponge off academic institutions, molest students, and then inappropriately punish tax-payers who never authorized molestation rights for this super-jock hierarchs.  All a university needs in the way of sports is intramural games to encourage exericize of those who may become too sedentary.  The elevation of good players into a pampered élite defeats the purpose of the university which is basically a place to cultivate the mind, not the biceps and abs.

Sportikos, refWrite Backpage sports newspotter, analyst, columnist

Christian Science Monitor (Dec3,2k13)

Gov. Tom Corbett to sue NCAA 

over Penn State sanctions

The Republican governor scheduled a Wednesday news conference on the Penn State campus in State College to announce the filing in US District Court in Harrisburg.

by Peter Jackson, Associated Press / January 2, 2013
Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett speaks at a news conference on the Penn State campus in State College, Pennsylvania, Wednesday. Corbett said he will file a federal lawsuit against the NCAA over sanctions it levied against Pennsylvania State University in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky child sex-abuse scandal. Over three dozen local and state officals along with Penn State students and former Penn State players took part in the news conference.
Craig Houtz/Reuters
HARRISBURG, Pennsylvania
Gov. Tom Corbett said Tuesday he plans to sue the NCAA in federal court over stiff sanctions imposed against Penn State University in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal.

The Republican governor scheduled a Wednesday news conference on the Penn State campus in State College to announce the filing in U.S. District Court inHarrisburg.
A person associated with the university and knowledgeable about the matter, speaking on the condition of anonymity because the lawsuit had not been filed, told The Associated Press that it is an antitrust action.
The NCAA sanctions, which were agreed to by the university in July, included a $60 million fine that would be used nationally to finance child abuse prevention grants. The sanctions also included a four-year bowl game ban for the university's marquee football program, reduced football scholarships and the forfeiture of 112 wins but didn't include a suspension of the football program, the so-called death penalty.
The governor's office announced the news conference late Tuesday afternoon. His spokesman did not respond to repeated calls and emails seeking to confirm a Sports Illustrated story that cited anonymous sources saying a lawsuit was imminent.
Corbett's brief statement did not indicate whether his office coordinated its legal strategy with state Attorney General-elect Kathleen Kane, who is scheduled to be sworn in Jan. 15.
Kane, a Democrat, ran on a vow to investigate why it took state prosecutors nearly three years to chargeSandusky, an assistant under former football coach Joe Paterno. Corbett was the attorney general when that office took over the case in early 2009 and until he became governor in January 2011.
State and congressional lawmakers from Pennsylvania have objected to using the Penn State fine to finance activities in other states. Penn State has already made the first $12 million payment, and an NCAA task force is deciding how it should be spent.
The NCAA, which declined to comment Tuesday on the planned lawsuit, has said at least a quarter of the money would be spent in Pennsylvania.
Republican U.S. Rep. Charlie Dent called that an "unacceptable and unsatisfactory" response by the NCAA to a request from the state's U.S. House delegation that the whole $60 million be distributed to causes within the state.
Last week, state Sen. Jake Corman, a Republican whose district includes Penn State's main campus, said he plans to seek court action barring any of the first $12 million from being released to groups outside the state.
Sandusky, 68, was convicted in June on charges he sexually abused 10 boys, some on Penn State's campus. He's serving a 30- to 60-year state prison term.
Eight young men testified against him, describing a range of abuse they said went from grooming and manipulation to fondling, oral sex and anal rape when they were boys.
Sandusky did not testify at his trial but has maintained his innocence, acknowledging he showered with boys but insisting he never molested them.

No comments: